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Coronavirus: What’s happening in Canada and around the world Friday – CBC.ca

The European Union on Friday moved to reinstate COVID travel restrictions like quarantine and testing requirements for unvaccinated citizens of the United States and five other countries, two diplomats told Reuters.

virous outbreak britain

A plane is seen landing at London’s Heathrow Airport earlier this summer. The European Union on Friday moved to reinstate COVID travel restrictions like quarantine and testing requirements for unvaccinated citizens of the United States and five other countries, two diplomats told Reuters. (Steve Parsons/Press Association/The Associated Press)

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The European Union on Friday moved to reinstate COVID-19 travel restrictions like quarantine and testing requirements for unvaccinated citizens of the United States and five other countries, two diplomats told Reuters.

EU countries started a procedure to remove the United States from a list of countries whose citizens can travel to the 27-nation bloc without additional COVID restrictions.

The non-binding list currently has 23 countries on it, including Japan, Qatar and Ukraine, but some of the 27 EU countries already have their own limits on U.S. travellers in place.

One diplomat said other countries that would be removed from the safe travel list were Kosovo, Israel, Montenegro, Lebanon and North Macedonia.

The decision on new EU travel restrictions for foreigners would become final on Monday should no EU country object, the sources, as well as two more EU officials, added.

july 2021 file photo of italian premier mario draghi

Italian Premier Mario Draghi, seen in a photo taken in Rome last month, says the uneven global economic recovery and the ‘grossly unequal’ access to COVID-19 vaccines, especially in Africa, are making it harder to end the pandemic. (Riccardo De Luca/The Associated Press)

Also Friday, Italian Premier Mario Draghi said the uneven global economic recovery and the “grossly unequal” access to COVID-19 vaccines, especially in Africa, are making it harder to end the pandemic.

Draghi on Friday remotely addressed a meeting of the G-20 Compact with Africa. That’s an initiative begun in 2017 under the then-German presidency of the G-20, to promote private investment, particularly in infrastructure, in Africa.

Draghi noted that close to 60 per cent of the population of high-income countries have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while in low-income nations, only 1.4 per cent have.

“The global economy is just as uneven,” said Draghi, a former European Central Bank chief. He pointed out that emerging market and low-income countries have spent a far lower percentage of their GDP to boost growth after the pandemic’s economic shock.

“We must do more — much more — to help the countries that are most in need,” said Draghi.

-From Reuters and The Associated Press, last updated at 12:25 p.m. ET


What’s happening across Canada

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What’s happening around the world

health coronavirus serbia vaccination

A health-care worker waits during a 3rd-dose vaccination drive at the Belgrade Fair vaccination centre in Belgrade, Serbia, earlier this week. (Zorana Jevtic/Reuters)

As of late Friday morning, more than 214.8 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 case tracker. The reported global death toll stood at more than 4.4 million.

In the Americas, Argentine prosecutors have charged President Alberto Fernandez with allegedly breaking a mandatory quarantine, local media reported, when he and his partner hosted a birthday party last year with friends.

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Juan Rodriguez reacts while receiving Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine at a skid row community outreach event in Los Angeles. Even as COVID-19 cases rise in many U.S. states, the Supreme Court’s decision to allow evictions to resume ends protections for about 3.5 million people who said they faced eviction in the next two months. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

In the United States, the Supreme Court’s conservative majority is allowing evictions to resume across the country, blocking the Biden administration from enforcing a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic. The court’s action ends protections for roughly 3.5 million people in the U.S. who said they faced eviction in the next two months.

The U.S. state of Arizona surpassed one million COVID-19 cases Friday, becoming the 13th state to reach that milestone.

In Africa, South Africa will this weekend receive 2.2 million Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine doses donated by the United States to add to the 5.6 million doses it received from that country in July. The new doses come as the country continues to battle an extended resurgence of COVID-19 infections and is racing to vaccinate 67 per cent of its 60 million people by February next year.

The U.K. has donated additional 592,880 doses of the AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine to Nigeria, the British High Commission in Abuja has said, raising the total number of vaccine doses it has shared with Africa’s most populous country in August to 1,292,640. 

The doses, which are part of the 100 million the U.K. has promised to donate to the rest of the world by June 2022, will be a boost for the West African nation where some hundreds of thousands who received the first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine are still awaiting their second shot.

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A police officer wearing a face mask patrols along Nakamise shopping street on Thursday in Tokyo, where COVID-19 cases have been rising. (Carl Court/Getty Images)

In the Asia-Pacific region, a contaminant found in a batch of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines delivered to Japan is believed to be a metallic particle, Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported, citing sources at the health ministry.

New Zealand’s government has extended a strict nationwide lockdown through Tuesday as it tries to quash its first outbreak of the coronavirus in six months. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Friday the government expects to keep Auckland, where most of the cases have been found, in full lockdown for at least two more weeks.

In the Middle East, Iran on Thursday reported 36,758 new cases of COVID-19 and 694 additional deaths.

In Europe, Russia on Friday reported 798 coronavirus-related deaths in the last 24 hours as well as 19,509 new cases, including 1,509 in Moscow. Official case numbers have been gradually falling since a surge of infections blamed on the highly contagious delta variant peaked in July.

mask wearing women entering a moscow subway station during the covid 19 pandemic

A woman wearing a protective face mask is seen entering a Moscow subway station earlier this month. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

The Danish government will no longer consider COVID-19 as “a socially critical disease in Denmark,” citing the large number of vaccinations in the Scandinavian country. “The epidemic is under control. We have record high vaccination rates,” said Health Minister Magnus Heunicke in a statement Friday.

-From The Associated Press, Reuters and CBC News, last updated at 1 p.m ET